@ClarySarah

Sarah Clary

Raised in northern California, Sarah Clary set out to New York with big fashion dreams. Starting with a more corporate role at J. Crew, Sarah then transitioned to styling for Crewcuts, as encouraged by Jenna Lyons who she now works alongside. Her experiences have inspired a carefree approach to style: one that is always open to new cuts, prints and shapes, evident in her closet of Miu Miu, Prada and more. 

What does the word Muse mean to you?

A muse is someone who inspires, and I'm drawn to all different types of muses for different reasons and times in my life. Besides style icons, I also appreciate those that live out loud, are unapologetically themselves, and expresses themselves on their own terms.

What’s the easiest way to dress up a simple look and instantly elevate it?

Tonal dressing is always a no brainer. The key is to always find colors that vary in shades and textures so it isn't head-to-toe one-note. Belts, ribbons, scarves and accessories are a go-to when I need to elevate something I have worn a hundred times. Cinch the belt over a blazer, tie a scarf over a turtleneck, use a ribbon at the waist of a dress. 

As a stylist, how do you feel like fashion and the ways we dress can tell a story?

We tell a story every day. I used to write down my looks every single day in middle and high school. Often, I repeated garments but never the same way. I challenged myself to tell a story differently with every garment I owned. I could be preppy, casual, over-the-top, glam, all with the same items, just styled differently. 

What was your experience like working in kids' styling?

When I started in the kids market at Crewcuts a gazillion years ago, I wasn't really sure it was for me. But one thing I loved about it was how kids don't have connections to clothes in the same way adults do and aren't as confined by industry standards. My approach was to show their personality, so that the family member shopping could see the spirit of their own child in the line.  

Where do you find inspiration when it comes to new trends and silhouettes? 

I don't really follow trends, but sometimes I'm drawn to a color I see in art or in old photos and I exhaust all the places I can find it: new, vintage or consignment. I am rooted in the classics, but from there, I go in a million directions. I buy what I love, which is sometimes impractical, but also practical is overrated.

What is a go-to designer that you’re always turning to season after season? 

Brands that I loved 20 years ago I still love today but feel silly in some of them now as my style evolves. The key to finding your personal style is to shop everywhere, even if you don't buy. It gives you a crash course on fabrics, tailoring, designers' backgrounds, and maybe some styling ideas you've never considered. You start to recognize certain prints, colors and cuts that work for you and what doesn't and often discover something you had otherwise written off.

What does the word Muse mean to you?

A muse is someone who inspires, and I'm drawn to all different types of muses for different reasons and times in my life. Besides style icons, I also appreciate those that live out loud, are unapologetically themselves, and expresses themselves on their own terms.

What’s the easiest way to dress up a simple look and instantly elevate it?

Tonal dressing is always a no brainer. The key is to always find colors that vary in shades and textures so it isn't head-to-toe one-note. Belts, ribbons, scarves and accessories are a go-to when I need to elevate something I have worn a hundred times. Cinch the belt over a blazer, tie a scarf over a turtleneck, use a ribbon at the waist of a dress. 

As a stylist, how do you feel like fashion and the ways we dress can tell a story?

We tell a story every day. I used to write down my looks every single day in middle and high school. Often, I repeated garments but never the same way. I challenged myself to tell a story differently with every garment I owned. I could be preppy, casual, over-the-top, glam, all with the same items, just styled differently. 

What was your experience like working in kids' styling?

When I started in the kids market at Crewcuts a gazillion years ago, I wasn't really sure it was for me. But one thing I loved about it was how kids don't have connections to clothes in the same way adults do and aren't as confined by industry standards. My approach was to show their personality, so that the family member shopping could see the spirit of their own child in the line.  

Where do you find inspiration when it comes to new trends and silhouettes? 

I don't really follow trends, but sometimes I'm drawn to a color I see in art or in old photos and I exhaust all the places I can find it: new, vintage or consignment. I am rooted in the classics, but from there, I go in a million directions. I buy what I love, which is sometimes impractical, but also practical is overrated.

What is a go-to designer that you’re always turning to season after season? 

Brands that I loved 20 years ago I still love today but feel silly in some of them now as my style evolves. The key to finding your personal style is to shop everywhere, even if you don't buy. It gives you a crash course on fabrics, tailoring, designers' backgrounds, and maybe some styling ideas you've never considered. You start to recognize certain prints, colors and cuts that work for you and what doesn't and often discover something you had otherwise written off.